COVID-19 Increased Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

A study published concludes that the COVID-19 pandemic has increased anxiety and major depressive disorder (MDD) especially for women and young people.

  • Existing health and social inequality in most nations continue to affect women and their suffering.
    Existing health and social inequality in most nations continue to affect women and their suffering.

A study published on Friday concluded that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increase in anxiety and major depressive disorders worldwide, especially for women and young people.

In the first worldwide estimate of the mental health impact of COVID-19, researchers estimated that year 2020 left an additional 52 million people suffering from Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and an additional 76 million cases from anxiety.

According to the study published in The Lancet, these represent a 28 and 26 percent increase in the two mental disorders respectively.

The study found a pattern linking the pandemic to mental health disorders, where high COVID-19 cases and lockdowns were simultaneous with increased rates of depression and anxiety.

"Our findings highlight an urgent need to strengthen mental health systems in order to address the growing burden," said lead author of the study, Damian Santomauro, from the University of Queensland's School of Public Health.

During the pandemic, already existing health and social inequality in most nations continue to affect women and their suffering, such as domestic violence, the study showed.

In addition, school and college closures negatively affected young people's ability to learn, interact with peers, and become employed.