UK Start Tests to Identify 50 Types of Potential Cancers

The United Kingdom is going to launch the world's biggest trial of Galleri multi-cancer detection test that can be used to detect more than 50 types of cancer before symptoms appear.

  • Over 100,000 individuals volunteered to participate in Galleri blood screening
    Over 100,000 individuals volunteered to participate in Galleri blood screening.

The National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom is going to run blood tests to detect 50 types of cancers before symptoms appear. 

The blood test, called the Galleri test, which is already used in the United States, will now be used in the UK. It can detect and identify cancer types that are not usually screened for; it can reveal what part of the body the cancer is targeting if found. 

Over 1,000 volunteers are being requested to take the blood test at mobile test clinics in particular areas across the kingdom to examine how it could work in the health sector. 

This step is being taken in order to help reduce the identification of cancer rates at early stages, and hence give more hope to treat patients suffering from its lethal symptoms.

The NHS is writing to 140,000 people aged 50 to 77 from different ethnic backgrounds and inviting them to take part in the trial. Participants, who must not have had a cancer diagnosis in the past three years, will be asked to give a first blood sample at a mobile test clinic, and further samples one and two years later.

The NHS is writing and encouraging 140,000 people between 50 and 77 years to take part in the trial from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Participants must not have had a cancer diagnosis in the previous three years and will be requested to provide an initial blood sample at a mobile test clinic, as well as additional samples one and two years later.

The Galleri test was created by the medtech firm Grail, which is now cooperating with the Cancer Research UK and King's College London's Cancer Prevention Trials Unit to make the trial.

The study's initial findings are expected in 2023. If the trial is successful, the NHS in England wants to expand the rollout to one million more individuals in 2024 and 2025.

If an individual is tested positive, he will be contacted by the trial nurse and transported to a hospital for further tests.